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  • Writer's pictureParker Hewes

The New Beginning: Learning to hit Restart

If you read my last post, you'd know that I’m at a pretty pivotal time in my life. Well, let's be blunt. I'm at my financial rock bottom. So, I would say this pivotal moment is more like a faceplant than a pivot. But I have realized many times in my life that great change comes with great loss. Even more so, I’ve realized that I am highly motivated by failure. Failure breathes new life into my actions, causing me to refocus on things that matter most to me, and with a level of vigor that I can’t create in any other way.


The problem is that this gumption is fleeting. I have a hard time staying consistent and maintaining my vigor because consistency is kind of boring. I like new and novel experiences (as do most people) and I get a lot of excitement from the learning and growth process. But when the newness wears off, the implementation phase almost always proves to be less exciting.


I think a lot of people can relate, which is why there are only a handful of people that make it to the top of their field. It's why the bell curve exists for most social behaviors. The people who are committed to consistency are those who end up in the top 20%, from professional athletes to business executives to parents and teachers. Of course, there are other factors at play, but consistency and grit are the major players. Name an area of success in your life, and I'll point to a pattern of consistent behaviors that preceded it (whether purposeful or not). The difference between the best and the 'middle-of-the-pack' is that the best show up, especially when it's boring or hard (or maybe they are lucky enough to never get bored by consistency).


I'm not saying that everyone has to be a master at everything that’s important to them. There's nothing wrong with doing just enough to meet the goals that are valuable to you. For example, I like adventure sports like mountain biking, snowboarding, rock climbing, etc. but I don't care to be an elite competitor. So, I will show up just enough to be an amateur at these activities.

There's nothing wrong with doing just enough to meet the goals that are valuable to you.

However, I have ambitions to be a competitive obstacle course racer, a successful writer/podcaster, and financially independent by age 40. I'm going to have to show up if I expect to meet these ambitious goals.

Considering my current state (with my face firmly planted in the pavement of financial ruin), I clearly haven't been very consistent with my goals of being financially independent. Instead, over the last few years I have bounced back and forth between multiple financial pursuits and jobs, taken breaks to “figure it all out,” and then circled back to the pursuits that I had already pursued before. This can be largely attributed to my past programming around money, but it is also a failure of my habit formation and my motivation for wealth (which is significantly informed by my past programming). However, as I mentioned earlier, my failure in this area has motivated me to refocus on all of my goals and pursue them with a vigor that's on another level.


Specifically, I am currently in the middle of a streak of vigor regarding this blog, but I've struggled with consistency when creating content in the past. Teaching and creating educational content are things that give me immense energy and enjoyment. However, that excitement quickly wanes when the mundane tasks related to blogging and podcasting drain my passion and diminish my vigor.

So, the reason why I am writing all of this is to announce to everyone that I am going to start practicing consistency with the Getting Gooder platform. I’m going to write, record, and film every week. No matter what the excuse, I want to continue to create content for you. And, if you’re willing, I’m hoping I can ask you a favor.

If I miss a week of publishing a blog and a podcast, I want you to call me out. Something as simple as, “Where’s your article this week?” will be sufficient. Because if you’re going to show up for me and desire what I have to say each week, then I want to show up two-fold for you.


That’s why this article is called “The Beginning.” Even though I’ve posted other articles in the past, this is the beginning of a new era of regularity and consistency. And if you're anything like me, you could learn from my example. If you have a goal that you've struggled to achieve, try this strategy of announcing your intentions to the public. Tell the world that you are going to deliver, and use that announcement as your source of accountability.

If you have a goal that you've struggled to achieve, try this strategy of announcing your intentions to the public. Tell the world that you are going to deliver, and use that announcement as your source of accountability.

With that in mind, here's my promise:

I’m promising to create:

- A blog article every week

- A podcast every week

- A published book in less than 3 years (maybe sooner if I self-publish)


I’m really excited about the future of the Getting Gooder brand, and I have a lot in store for you. But I know that I may need your help sometimes. Of course, I will. Because, even though it’s just me behind a computer, this community of people is what keeps me motivated. If you could give me that friendly jab if I ever miss a week of posting, I’d be very thankful. Y'all are so great. Here’s to a long and happy life together. Let’s get it.

 

Written by Parker Hewes, a chiropractor, author, American Ninja Warrior, and serial adventurer living in Salt Lake City, Utah. Parker believes learning and growing are the keys to living a full life. He started Getting Gooder to help others learn and grow, so they can create the happiest, healthiest, and wealthiest lives imaginable.

Parker also knows that our ideal life gets even better when we have others to share it with. So, keep following Parker and the Getting Gooder community as we build our ideal, together.

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